Jackie Chan's son Jaycee Chan Stars in Action Comedy "Double Trouble;" Too Bad It's No Good

Jaycee Chan in "Double Trouble"

The main market for “Double Trouble,” an action comedy starring Jaycee Chan (Jackie Chan’s son) released on June 8th, is probably Hong Kong, but I can’t find any numbers there yet. In China, it barely cracked the top 10 with just $0.7M after three days. In the U.S., it has grossed $30K from twelve theaters. The elder Chan would break out in a cold sweat if he saw these miniscule numbers for any of his films.

I’m not surprised. The trailer makes it seem like a generic HK action comedy from the 90’s. It’s slick, bright and shiny, but I couldn’t see anything resembling a coherent fight scene. It has the same look and feel of the elder Chan’s recent trailer for “Chinese Zodiac,” except not nearly as polished or ambitious.

"Double Trouble" trailer with English subtitle:

Jaycee does look like split image of a young Jackie. According to reviews, he has his charm too, which is good to hear.

Jaycee was pretty good in the cop thriller “Invisible Target,” but he was in better hands with that film. It was directed by Benny Chan, who directed his father in “New Police Story” and “Rob-B-Hood,” both hits in Hong Kong. It also stars Nicholas Tse, Jacky Wu, and Andy On, a solid group of young up-and-coming screen fighters.

Jaycee Chan fight scene from "Invisible Target:"

Although the Jackie Chan Stunt Team is behind the action sequences in “Double Trouble,” Jaycee’s director and co-stars in the film aren’t in the league as those from “Invisible Target.” He gets top billing and shoulders the entire film.

According to several reviews - all of them bad except one - the action sequences are poorly choreographed and edited. The film does move by quickly, which is good, but it’s a disappointment overall.

The only good review is from Ernest Hardy of Village Voice, who writes “Young Chan does his father proud with his fighting prowess, but also on a much more superficial level, he fits right in with all the eye candy, male and female, that fills the screen.” I would have an easier time taking his review seriously if he didn’t misattribute the director of the film to Jiang Wen. Wen directed “Let the Bullets Fly,” the highest grossing film of all time in China. He’ll have nightmares if the Village Voice doesn’t make that correction soon. “Double Trouble” is actually directed by David Chang, who worked on the action sequences for "Bullet."

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