48 FPS Hobbit Will Cost the Same as Regular 3D

The Hobbit

According to Variety, exhibitors have agreed to price the 48 frames-per-seconds showings of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey the same as regular 3D, which is usually $3-$5 more than 2D prices.

Since the high frame rate showings of the movie are not going to be widely available and are restricted to select locations, and may not even be available in all major cities, this bit of news may be irrelevant to most people.

But since The Hobbit is the first major series of movies to be released in 48 fps, and with the industry moving towards that direction, this pricing signal suggests the cost for high frame plus 3D will remain the same as plain 3D when the new format becomes the norm.

As previously reported, Warner Bros decided to protect the emerging format with a slow rollout of the first Hobbit movie due to negative reactions from a 10-min clip shown at Cinema-Con back in April. Attendees complained that the smoothness and clarity of the scenes made the what they're watching seemed less cinematic, likening it to a hi-def TV show.

Since the Hobbit movies are filmed in 48 fps, they actually have to go through a conversion process for them to be shown in regular 2D projectors.

The first Hobbit movie, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, is scheduled to come out on December 24 this year. It is followed by The Hobbit: There and Back Again on December 13, 2013, with the third untitled movie coming in summer 2014.

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